2003 News and Developments
Date News and Developments
2/1/2003 Hi, My name is Aurelio Cartaño jr. i dont know if we are related,my Cartaño
is with an Ñ,anyway we are from the Philippines,my grandfather told me that
we came from a spanish ancestors i dont know if is precise,he said we have
been here since the early 1700 ihave been wondering where we realy came
from,now its nice to know that i've finally found some lead to where we
might came from just to teel you something about us,the early known Cartaño
is the father of my grandfather Pedro Cartano,they had four chidren,Alberto
the oldest and i dont know the names of the other 3 i will ask my father
about that,Alberto my grandfather had 4children,Aurelio Sr. my
father,Patricia,Remedios and Librado,they are now all living in laguna a
province in Luzon the northern part of the Philippines,My dad has 7
children,Rene,Ronaldo,Rowena,Roberto,Rosa Mia whos now in Canada,Ricardo and
me Aurelio,all of them have their own families except me,I will try to
gather some more information about our history and i will let you know.

Regards,
Aurelio

#11 Kentucky St.Bambang Taguig
Metro Manila,Philippines
11/12/2003 Email from Anna Cartano Gascoigne:

Angela and Steve and the kids are fine, but they were a little nervous. The tornado touched down just ten minutes from their home. They put themselves and the children into the bathtub and put a mattress over them. Evelyn and Daniel thought it was a slumber party and giggled and laughed. Alicia was at the downtown Weston for her first date with Mr. Right (Phil). After dinner, the sirens sounded and everyone had to go to the basement of the hotel where other guests were in the pajamas.David slep soundly in the northern part of the state where the tornado did not go. Rob asked me, "So, you think you want to live in Oklahoma?" Hmmm. Maybe not. We're thankful to God for his protection.
6/15/2003 Email from Julie Cartano Rourke regarding Jack Savard:

Jack graduated from Sacred Heart Kindergarten last week. The Principal
noted that he has integrity and will probably head the Student Council
someday. Way to go, Jack!
Aunt Julie
10/30/2003 Email from Margaret Cartano Hewes regarding her daughter:

Deering girls play in the state championship on Sat.! They won the Western
Maine Championship 1-0 this evening and will play the best of the East for
the title on Saturday. The East team hasn't lost a game or hardly a point
so it should be interesting--we hope. Right now, we are just happy to be
going at this point.

Margaret
11/16/2003 Email from Margaret Cartano Hewes:

I thought you might be interested in the following web page regarding the U.S.S. John Penn. Dad rescued 33 men from this ship before it sank and received the navy marine corps medal for his efforts. I e-mailed the guy and he may add dad's story to the page.

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~diving/articles/johnpenn.htm


Thanks. Will read offline and use to update web site.

Regards.

Michael McFadyen
Michael McFadyen's Scuba Diving Web Site
diving@ozemail.com.au
members.ozemail.com.au/~diving

-----Original Message-----
From: mhewes [mailto:mhewes@maine.rr.com]
Sent: Saturday, 15 November 2003 2:03 PM
To: diving@ozemail.com.au
Subject: uss john penn


My dad received the Navy Marine Corp. Medal for rescuing 33 men from the sinking U.S.S. John Penn. I have a transcript of the radio show made about the rescue. I thought you might be interested.
MHewes

The John Cartano Story
~Radio Special

"For every American's war . . .

In this dramatic story, which you hear James tell, Bethlehem Steel, builders of ships for victory, brings you a message, which we cannot afford to forget.

He was always a great sports fan. He loved baseball, football and basketball, and played a darn good game of golf and tennis. His dad loved these games, too, and they played a lot together, all this was back in their hometown of Seattle Washington. By the way, we're talking about John D. Cartano of that city. John did a good job of playing the game of life, too.

He graduated from both high school and college with honors. Then he became a successful practicing attorney in a Seattle law firm. Finally, he decided to get into the biggest game that's being played right now, the game of war to victory. He's now Lieutenant John D. Cartano of the United States Navy.

The U.S.S. John Penn, a transport cargo ship, was just off Guadal Canal. It was August 13, 1943, and she was bringing to a large troop fighting in the Solomon's area a much-needed cargo of ammunition. Suddenly out of the sky screamed a formation of Jap torpedo planes. One enemy plane put her fish right through the engine room of the John Penn. A terrific explosion tore a great hole in the vessel and almost immediately she was a blazing popping inferno.

Nearby lying off Guadal Canal was an army patrol craft, the USS APC 25. Her commanding officer, Navy Lieutenant John D. Cartano, saw what was happening to the helpless transport. While the radio communications systems in the vicinity crackled with various opinions on what should be done, he had already made up his mind. In those radio contacts, they were agreeing that it would be too dangerous for other vessels to approach the burning exploding USS Penn.

It appeared obvious that there was little chance of saving anyone. The danger of getting anywhere near that exploding inferno was great. But Lt. Cartano and his small craft was already proceeding at full speed toward the quickly sinking cargo ship. The USS Penn went down twenty minutes after the torpedo struck. The sea around the sinking ship was aflame with burning oil. But Lt. Cartano brought his small craft in as close as he dared and
began the job of picking up survivors. He realized he would have to work fast. Some of the men in the water had on life jackets, but others, and among them were many wounded, had none.

Lt. Cartano got search, rescue, and first aid parties into action immediately. He and his men worked hard, and they worked fast, and later when they counted the survivors, they found Lt. Cartano's little patrol craft had pulled out 33 men. The USS Penn's Capt. Roberts suffering from a bad shoulder and burns turned up among the survivors, too. The rescued were given pajamas and coveralls for something to wear, and as they lined up on the beach for roll call to check the missing, another alarm sounded. The Jap planes were coming again and Lt. Cartano's rescue had been effective just in time. For his courageous action and splendid initiative, Lt. Cartano was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal. Yes, it's men like Lt. Cartano who are showing what courage and initiative can accomplish in the conduct of this war, but without ships this war would be impossible. Ships of all kinds are
urgently needed to carry a live cargo and to fight the enemy. Men are needed now with or without shipyard experience at the Hobocan Yard of Bethlehem Steel Company to repair the condition and convert ships required for war service. Here is your chance to get directly behind our boys. Men not in essential industry, also veterans or those classified as 4F or otherwise draft deferred, can learn a technical trade that pays while learning.."
12/31/2003 E-mail from Anna Cartano Gascoigne:

David, how are you enjoying the cookbook. Isn't it fantastic! What a great job Margaret did. I'm enclosing a copy of the skit for you if you'd like to post it on the net. Love Anna

DINNER at CARTANO’s

(Grandmother Florence and Mother Jane are in the kitchen sectioning nine grapefruit halves. Julie is cutting out a prom dress on top of the dining room table.)

Mom—Julie dear, it’s time to pour the milk. Dad will be here any moment, and he’s had a hard day and won’t want to see all this mess on the dining table.

Julie—Oh Mom, not now! I have to tape up this hem. It will only take me ten more minutes.

Mom—We don’t have ten more minutes, dear. Now pack up your machine and patterns and take them downstairs. You have a lovely basement and you can spread your things out on the ping pong table.

Julie—Oh Mom, really! Randy is probably already here. I can’t go to the prom with my hem hanging out. How about the staple gun? That might take less time. Where does Dad keep the blasted staple gun?

Mom—Maybe in one of the kitchen drawers. I’ll take a look. (Mom leaves.)

(Grandmother Florence enters the dining room with tray of grapefruit. She is miffed.)

Grandmother--You children just don’t know what a wonderful mother you have. She’s been working on this meal since four o’clock this afternoon while you children did nothing but eat crackers and talk on the phone, and now that it’s time to serve the meal, none of you will lift a hand. Shame on you! Your monthly confession will take hours.

Julie—I’m sorry Grandmother, but I have a date tonight and I . . . .

Grandmother—A date! You’re only seventeen and you’ve got rowdy boys prowling around the back porch almost nightly. You ought to stay home and help your poor mother instead of running off with those hooligans to who knows where! It just isn’t right. And I suppose you’re going to one of those ‘B’ rated movies.

Julie—It’s prom night, Grandmother. It’s a legitimate school activity. I’m the Girl’s Club President and I have to be there. I’m in charge of decorations and tickets, too. They need me. I can help Mom tomorrow, I promise.

Grandmother—Promises, promises. Jane promised she wouldn’t have any more children after the fourth one. Whatever happened to those good intentions? Helene was a surprise, but at least she didn’t cry. Margaret’s head was way too big and she just about pushed your mother over the edge. It’s a good thing Joan was perfect or you’d all be in foster homes at this very minute!!

Joan—(Joan walks into the room) Did someone say that I was perfect? It’s no surprise is it? God saved the best genes for last.

David—(sitting nearby) No, Grandmother said that I was perfect. Didn’t you Grandmother?

Grandmother—Did I say that? (she hugs David) I might have. Now, where was I? Julie, you heard your mother. Get those things off the table. David, do you think you could drive me home, tonight? The streets might be icy.

David—Sure Grandmother. Anything for you.

Grandmother—You dear boy. You’re just like your Granddad David Bronson. (Grandmother exits as Julie is madly trying to finish the hem on her dress.)

Mom —(Mom enters) Julie dear, I couldn’t find the staple gun. How about Elmer’s glue?

Julie—That will never work. I tried it last time, and my dress stuck to the car seat.

Mom—Julie dear, you really must get these things off the table. Helene, I believe it’s your turn to set the table.

Helene—It couldn’t possibly be my turn. I did it for Ann last night and the night before, and the night before that. She says she’ll do them for me in exchange for all of my Halloween candy that she finished off, but she never does. Everyone is just using me.

Ann—You didn’t do the dishes for me last night.

Helene—Yes I did. You were out with that ugly boy friend of yours. You know, the one with the obnoxious GTO and the cowboy boots.

Ann—Hmm. Maybe you’re right. Well-- you owe me anyway, for all the times I’ve done it for you when you were out playing with Craig and Matt Tanselli.

Helene-- Margaret plays with them. Not me!

Dad—Hidy Ho. (Dad walks in and kisses Jane and gives her a few pats.) MMMmm, that’s my ‘Tuter!’ Isn’t she the best mother in the world? Don’t you agree, children?

Kids (in unison) Yes Dad.

Dad—When Howard Laurent introduced me to this wonderful home economist so many years ago, I had no idea where life would be taking us.

Grandmother Florence—I don’t think Jane did, either. If she had, she would have denied the faith and taken things into her own hands.

Mom—Mother, how can you talk like that? Each one of these children is like a gift from heaven.

Grandmother—Gifts from heaven? More like ‘messengers sent from Satan to buffet the flesh.’ Well, I’ve had just about all the buffeting I can stand. Is someone going to set that table or not?

Joan—I’ll do it, Grandmother. I fed Flapper and Pam too, and it’s not even my night. (Joan madly scurries to set the table.)

Mom—Mother, maybe you’d like to put the rest of the grapefruits on the table. John is about ready to say grace. (Grandmother does as she is told. David puts two milk cartons on the table. Margaret comes to the table with a blanket over her head.
Helene comes to the table with a doll.

Julie—Bye everyone. My ride is in the drive and I’m out of here!!!

John—‘Bless us oh Lord and these thy gifts.’ Well kids, whose dessert am I getting a bite out of tonight?

Jane— Where is Bob? He should have heard the bell.

Ann—I saw him up at the neighbors. I think he was smoking.

Jane—Now Ann, how can you say such a thing? Bob would never do a thing like that.
He has one hundred dollars coming to him for his 21st birthday, after all.

John—Wherever he is and whatever he’s done, he’s in the Booper’s club as far as I’m concerned.

(Bob strolls in with an ‘attitude.’) Yeah, yeah, yeah, what did I do this time?

John—Bob, I’m not happy about my tools being left out in the rain. And your room is a mess. I’ve told you again and again, you can’t work on that hydro-foil in your bedroom.

Bob—Well, there isn’t any room in the garage. What’s a boy supposed to do?

Grandmother—You can help out around here. That’s what.

Jane—Mom, maybe you would enjoy emptying the dishwasher.

Grandmother—Well, maybe I would rather be in the kitchen than in here with a bunch of disrespectful kids.

David—Yeah, Bob. Show a little respect. You aren’t doing too well in school, either.

Bob—Shut up, will ya. Why don’t you take your lousy milk cartons off of the table so I can see where the food is? You’re crowding me, brother. Look, I’ve gotta get back up to Mack’s. We got a project going. (Bob grabs something to eat and starts to leave the table.

Dad—Hold on, Bob. You haven’t been excused, and I can’t allow you to talk back. Your driving privileges are suspended for one week.

Bob—Fine, just fine. Now you explain to Debbie and Cindy and Tracy why I stood them up.

David—Hey Bob, I think it’s your night for the dishes.

Bob—Tell me about it, David. Don’t think we don’t know you rigged that little, dish chart hanging up in the kitchen. Your turn only comes around only every other time. Do you think we can’t count?

David—Those are erroneous allegations, but I’ll look the other way. You’re in luck, Bob. Even though it’s your turn, Ann says she will do the dishes for you tonight.

Ann—I said that?

David—Yes, Ann and I have a little arrangement. Don’t we, Ann? She got the honor of wearing one of my shirts to the CYO dance last week, and now she owes me one. Well, I figure that if she fills in for Bob, then Bob will owe me, too. I helped Helene with her homework, I wrote a paper for Margaret, and I drive Grandmother home every night. Soon everyone in the family will owe me.

Bob—Yeah, and I suppose Dad owes you for torching his lawn last summer when he was away in Europe? Do you charge for arson?

Margaret (with blanket over her head) I can’t take this anymore. I mean, this is a nightmare. This fighting is like Chinese water torch. (She looks like she’s in pain.) If you all keep this us, I might have to go out and get a tattoo, or drive without seat belts.

Mom—Don’t do anything rash, Margaret. Joan, you haven’t eaten a thing on your plate.

Joan—I had a wheat thin after school.

Mom—Wheat thins don’t have any nutritional value, Joan. You need protein and vitamin B and calcium. You’re a growing girl.

Joan—I don’t want to grow. I like myself the way I am.

Bob—Who cares? What does it matter?

Mom—How was your day, Bob?

Bob—Just peachy. (very sarcastic)

Mom—I’m glad to hear that, Bob. Why don’t you tell us about it?

Bob—There’s not much to say. I fell asleep in two classes and flunked Lamont’s exam.

Dad—Don’t talk disrespectfully to your mother, Bob. I suppose you’re picking up this sassy attitude from that Communist teacher of yours. I’m planning to pay Mr. Sorenson a surprise visit next Monday.

Bob—Please don’t, Dad. If he finds out you voted for Nixon, I’ll get an ‘F’ for sure.

Mom—Bob, I know you don’t really mean what you’re saying.

Bob—I mean exactly what I’m saying. Dad’s been to my class before and I don’t think I can take it again.

Grandmother—Oh my!! I think I saw a snow flake.

All the kids—SNOW, SNOW. Yeah, no school tomorrow!!!!

Grandmother—Oh no! How will I ever make it home to Mercer Island?

Mom—You can stay here overnight, Mother.

Grandmother—No, please! Don’t make me stay the night! David will take me home. He’s such a good boy. If it weren’t for him, this family would be totally dysfunctional.


DINNER at CARTANO’s

(Grandmother Florence and Mother Jane are in the kitchen sectioning nine grapefruit halves. Julie is cutting out a prom dress on top of the dining room table.)

Mom—Julie dear, it’s time to pour the milk. Dad will be here any moment, and he’s had a hard day and won’t want to see all this mess on the dining table.

Julie—Oh Mom, not now! I have to tape up this hem. It will only take me ten more minutes.

Mom—We don’t have ten more minutes, dear. Now pack up your machine and patterns and take them downstairs. You have a lovely basement and you can spread your things out on the ping pong table.

Julie—Oh Mom, really! Randy is probably already here. I can’t go to the prom with my hem hanging out. How about the staple gun? That might take less time. Where does Dad keep the blasted staple gun?

Mom—Maybe in one of the kitchen drawers. I’ll take a look. (Mom leaves.)

(Grandmother Florence enters the dining room with tray of grapefruit. She is miffed.)

Grandmother--You children just don’t know what a wonderful mother you have. She’s been working on this meal since four o’clock this afternoon while you children did nothing but eat crackers and talk on the phone, and now that it’s time to serve the meal, none of you will lift a hand. Shame on you! Your monthly confession will take hours.

Julie—I’m sorry Grandmother, but I have a date tonight and I . . . .

Grandmother—A date! You’re only seventeen and you’ve got rowdy boys prowling around the back porch almost nightly. You ought to stay home and help your poor mother instead of running off with those hooligans to who knows where! It just isn’t right. And I suppose you’re going to one of those ‘B’ rated movies.

Julie—It’s prom night, Grandmother. It’s a legitimate school activity. I’m the Girl’s Club President and I have to be there. I’m in charge of decorations and tickets, too. They need me. I can help Mom tomorrow, I promise.

Grandmother—Promises, promises. Jane promised she wouldn’t have any more children after the fourth one. Whatever happened to those good intentions? Helene was a surprise, but at least she didn’t cry. Margaret’s head was way too big and she just about pushed your mother over the edge. It’s a good thing Joan was perfect or you’d all be in foster homes at this very minute!!

Joan—(Joan walks into the room) Did someone say that I was perfect? It’s no surprise is it? God saved the best genes for last.

David—(sitting nearby) No, Grandmother said that I was perfect. Didn’t you Grandmother?

Grandmother—Did I say that? (she hugs David) I might have. Now, where was I? Julie, you heard your mother. Get those things off the table. David, do you think you could drive me home, tonight? The streets might be icy.

David—Sure Grandmother. Anything for you.

Grandmother—You dear boy. You’re just like your Granddad David Bronson. (Grandmother exits as Julie is madly trying to finish the hem on her dress.)

Mom —(Mom enters) Julie dear, I couldn’t find the staple gun. How about Elmer’s glue?

Julie—That will never work. I tried it last time, and my dress stuck to the car seat.

Mom—Julie dear, you really must get these things off the table. Helene, I believe it’s your turn to set the table.

Helene—It couldn’t possibly be my turn. I did it for Ann last night and the night before, and the night before that. She says she’ll do them for me in exchange for all of my Halloween candy that she finished off, but she never does. Everyone is just using me.

Ann—You didn’t do the dishes for me last night.

Helene—Yes I did. You were out with that ugly boy friend of yours. You know, the one with the obnoxious GTO and the cowboy boots.

Ann—Hmm. Maybe you’re right. Well-- you owe me anyway, for all the times I’ve done it for you when you were out playing with Craig and Matt Tanselli.

Helene-- Margaret plays with them. Not me!

Dad—Hidy Ho. (Dad walks in and kisses Jane and gives her a few pats.) MMMmm, that’s my ‘Tuter!’ Isn’t she the best mother in the world? Don’t you agree, children?

Kids (in unison) Yes Dad.

Dad—When Howard Laurent introduced me to this wonderful home economist so many years ago, I had no idea where life would be taking us.

Grandmother Florence—I don’t think Jane did, either. If she had, she would have denied the faith and taken things into her own hands.

Mom—Mother, how can you talk like that? Each one of these children is like a gift from heaven.

Grandmother—Gifts from heaven? More like ‘messengers sent from Satan to buffet the flesh.’ Well, I’ve had just about all the buffeting I can stand. Is someone going to set that table or not?

Joan—I’ll do it, Grandmother. I fed Flapper and Pam too, and it’s not even my night. (Joan madly scurries to set the table.)

Mom—Mother, maybe you’d like to put the rest of the grapefruits on the table. John is about ready to say grace. (Grandmother does as she is told. David puts two milk cartons on the table. Margaret comes to the table with a blanket over her head.
Helene comes to the table with a doll.

Julie—Bye everyone. My ride is in the drive and I’m out of here!!!

John—‘Bless us oh Lord and these thy gifts.’ Well kids, whose dessert am I getting a bite out of tonight?

Jane— Where is Bob? He should have heard the bell.

Ann—I saw him up at the neighbors. I think he was smoking.

Jane—Now Ann, how can you say such a thing? Bob would never do a thing like that.
He has one hundred dollars coming to him for his 21st birthday, after all.

John—Wherever he is and whatever he’s done, he’s in the Booper’s club as far as I’m concerned.

(Bob strolls in with an ‘attitude.’) Yeah, yeah, yeah, what did I do this time?

John—Bob, I’m not happy about my tools being left out in the rain. And your room is a mess. I’ve told you again and again, you can’t work on that hydro-foil in your bedroom.

Bob—Well, there isn’t any room in the garage. What’s a boy supposed to do?

Grandmother—You can help out around here. That’s what.

Jane—Mom, maybe you would enjoy emptying the dishwasher.

Grandmother—Well, maybe I would rather be in the kitchen than in here with a bunch of disrespectful kids.

David—Yeah, Bob. Show a little respect. You aren’t doing too well in school, either.

Bob—Shut up, will ya. Why don’t you take your lousy milk cartons off of the table so I can see where the food is? You’re crowding me, brother. Look, I’ve gotta get back up to Mack’s. We got a project going. (Bob grabs something to eat and starts to leave the table.

Dad—Hold on, Bob. You haven’t been excused, and I can’t allow you to talk back. Your driving privileges are suspended for one week.

Bob—Fine, just fine. Now you explain to Debbie and Cindy and Tracy why I stood them up.

David—Hey Bob, I think it’s your night for the dishes.

Bob—Tell me about it, David. Don’t think we don’t know you rigged that little, dish chart hanging up in the kitchen. Your turn only comes around only every other time. Do you think we can’t count?

David—Those are erroneous allegations, but I’ll look the other way. You’re in luck, Bob. Even though it’s your turn, Ann says she will do the dishes for you tonight.

Ann—I said that?

David—Yes, Ann and I have a little arrangement. Don’t we, Ann? She got the honor of wearing one of my shirts to the CYO dance last week, and now she owes me one. Well, I figure that if she fills in for Bob, then Bob will owe me, too. I helped Helene with her homework, I wrote a paper for Margaret, and I drive Grandmother home every night. Soon everyone in the family will owe me.

Bob—Yeah, and I suppose Dad owes you for torching his lawn last summer when he was away in Europe? Do you charge for arson?

Margaret (with blanket over her head) I can’t take this anymore. I mean, this is a nightmare. This fighting is like Chinese water torch. (She looks like she’s in pain.) If you all keep this us, I might have to go out and get a tattoo, or drive without seat belts.

Mom—Don’t do anything rash, Margaret. Joan, you haven’t eaten a thing on your plate.

Joan—I had a wheat thin after school.

Mom—Wheat thins don’t have any nutritional value, Joan. You need protein and vitamin B and calcium. You’re a growing girl.

Joan—I don’t want to grow. I like myself the way I am.

Bob—Who cares? What does it matter?

Mom—How was your day, Bob?

Bob—Just peachy. (very sarcastic)

Mom—I’m glad to hear that, Bob. Why don’t you tell us about it?

Bob—There’s not much to say. I fell asleep in two classes and flunked Lamont’s exam.

Dad—Don’t talk disrespectfully to your mother, Bob. I suppose you’re picking up this sassy attitude from that Communist teacher of yours. I’m planning to pay Mr. Sorenson a surprise visit next Monday.

Bob—Please don’t, Dad. If he finds out you voted for Nixon, I’ll get an ‘F’ for sure.

Mom—Bob, I know you don’t really mean what you’re saying.

Bob—I mean exactly what I’m saying. Dad’s been to my class before and I don’t think I can take it again.

Grandmother—Oh my!! I think I saw a snow flake.

All the kids—SNOW, SNOW. Yeah, no school tomorrow!!!!

Grandmother—Oh no! How will I ever make it home to Mercer Island?

Mom—You can stay here overnight, Mother.

Grandmother—No, please! Don’t make me stay the night! David will take me home. He’s such a good boy. If it weren’t for him, this family would be totally dysfunctional.